Resources for inspiration

I’ve been thinking I ought to dedicate a post to some of the various books, blogs, and other media I’ve come across that have inspired me.  I think every one of us has an innate yearning to build a cabin in the wilderness with all that entails:  a sense of self-sufficiency and pride of accomplishment, to commune with nature and our primitive impulses, or just simply fulfilling a basic survival need to construct a shelter from the elements.  Building a cabin in the woods, in a way, is the root of human ambition.  This impulse for the most modest of conquests has been described in literature through the ages with some of my favorite and well-known examples being Thoreau’s Walden, Hamsun’s Growth of the Soil, and Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac.  I remember seeing an enthralling documentary on PBS, Alone in the Wilderness, about Dick Proenneke who hand built a log cabin in Alaska where he lived for 30 years when I was younger and finding it just as inspiring when I revisited it on youtube a number of years later.  In that same vain, a number of bloggers I’ve been following have left me with a similar sense of awe and provided me with some degree of confidence that I could also pursue this dream.  Lou Ureneck’s From the Ground Up blog on the New York Times’ website details the account of the author building a cabin in Maine;  Philosophy professor Mark van Roojen’s website about building a timber frame cabin in Wyoming’s Sierra Madre; and joiner Peter Follansbee’s blog about working green wood with hand tools have been some of my favorites.  These are just a few examples of some of the great blogs out there that have made my dream of building a cabin with my own hands seem so tangible.  There are also some great video series available for free online that I watch religiously including Paul Sellers’ Woodworking Masterclasses, Wranglerstar’s Modern Homesteading, and Roy Underhill’s The Woodwright’s Shop on PBS.  If you’re reading this and dreaming of building your own cabin, I highly recommend checking out some of these other sites.  And if you have suggestions for other great sites, drop a link in the comment section so we can all keep pushing the dream forward.

dsc_0707

The Aurora Borealis viewed from Saganaga Lake in Minnesota/Ontario.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s